Saturday & Sunday (trip report)

By Saturday afternoon I’d had enough of the heavy rain and idiot drivers; I just missed contributing to a multi-car pileup on I-40 near Wallace. (Do not tailgate in heavy rain showers.)

I arrived in Wilmington, checked in to the hotel, and went looking for food. I pigged out – at Smithfield’s BBQ. Real eastern NC bbq is the one food I can’t readily reproduce in Jersey, thus the quick feast. After that it was time to explore the downtown a bit, take a few photos, and off to the theater.

I was in Wilmington to see “1776”, with lifelong friend Robin Dale Robertson in a substantial role – he played Mr. Thomson, clerk to the Continental Congress. Kudos for him for finding a role which allowed him to read his lines – every time!

The play was staged in the Ballroom/City Council Chamber space at Thalian Hall. Thalian Hall, built in 1858, has always combined the theatre with the city government of Wilmington. The staging allowed for a “House” seating area of two rows of seats on either side of the main floor (I was seated second row center on the far side); and a cabaret-style “Senate” area in the center – mixing actors and audience together. My rough count is there were 150 seats for the audience – thus a small show.

The staging made the action more interesting; the cast was generally excellent although a few actors were singing way too loud for the space. 1776 is a long show; it ran four hours and a bit on Broadway (I saw it in 1972 near the end of its run); this show clocked in close to five hours as some time was used at the start for a charitable fundraiser pitch… and more time used at intermission to take souvenir photos (or perhaps they were alibis!).

Sunday morning found a break in the clouds, and it was off to Salter Path (actually Pine Knoll Shores) for the Road Scholar Program. Since I had most of the day free before registration (4pm at Trinity Center) I decided to do a bit more photography, and check out the areas. It’s been three years since I was down here, and yes – there have been some significant changes.

I turned off in Jacksonville to take NC-24 up to the beach, and along the way stopped by the Cedar Point Wildlife Trail (part of Croatan National Forest) to see how the hurricane had affected the area. The damage is noticeable – a lot less trees in many areas, and most of the snags are gone. With the snags (dead trees still standing) gone, the ospreys have retreated to areas well back in the preserve.

But with a medium telephoto lens, and by carefully listening to calls, I was able to find a juvenile pair. I contemplated getting the big (500mm) lens out but it was starting to spit rain again, and that lens is not weather resistant. So I stayed with just the one photo of the pair:

Of course, as soon as I left it cleared up a bit, so I swung north on NC-58 to see about getting good photos of the oldest church in the vicinity – the 1815 Hadnot Creek Primitive Baptist church. When I got there, after a few perimeter shots and a ‘hope-it-works’ shot through the window, a car pulled in behind me. The woman (a neighbor) decided I was just a photographer, and tipped me to the cemeteries hidden behind the church.

After this, it was off to Trinity Center for a weak of Road Scholar. Photos from that tour, along with a review, will be in a forthcoming post.

First trip of 2019

So it was time to travel. Part of the rationale for leaving the college classroom was to allow for more flexibility in travel plans – thus time to test that out. I decided to give Road Scholar a whirl.

Road Scholar is the marketing name for Elderhostel, which organizes tours for older people to various locales, and around varied themes. My parents went on 27 such adventures over a ten-year span, and quite enjoyed most of them… back in the late 80s and early 90s. Nowadays the organization is vastly larger and attempts to appeal to a broader audience (hence the name change). I decided on a tour “Historic Homes and Gardens of NC’s Crystal Coast” – in that I knew it was in driving distance, I was familiar with the area, and it was relatively inexpensive. Continue reading First trip of 2019

Sunday morning on the rails

The good people of the Black River Railroad Historic Trust decided to run a steam-powered mixed-freight train. Naturally I had to be there, to get some photos.

grey coal smoke rises from the woods
Smoke rises from the woods as Engine #60 prepares for its time on camera.

steam engine on the move
First photo run of the morning; #60 pours on the power.

train crew watching
A careful crew is a safe crew; watching the track ahead.

engineer's hand on throttle
Hand on the throttle.

group of photographers trackside
Photographers and the conductor await the run at Bowne.

steam engine making turn
Cue the music as she comes around the bend.

Steam train gets closer
More power.

Steam train with observers in foreground
On the second run-by.

train crew talks with conductor
Crew receives new orders

Caboose with crew members
Starting the shove back home.

Several times during the trip, I was asked if I wanted to stand right up against the right-of-way (ROW in rail terms); that’s not necessary for my interests. It was a great way to spend a few hours on a sunny Sunday in September.

 

Migration

[…tap… tap… is this thing on??]

It’s time to abandon the Adobe-sphere before it abandons me. In October 2017 Adobe decided to kill off the last vestiges of perpetual (non-subscription) licensing for Lightroom… and change the name to “Lightroom Classic.” And making things worse, somewhere in November a routine update broke functionality on my venerable InDesign CS3.

Historically, renaming software to “classic” has been the indicator of abandonment of same, and I expect that’s what Adobe has in mind, as the all-new-shiny Lightroom CC is all cloud-based and mobile and “fun” and made into lightweight eye-candy for the iPhone set.

Now of course I could go with the flow and pay the tribute, which for Lightroom/Photoshop is $10/month, but InDesign isn’t included and that would add another $20/month. Not happening, at least not with me.

I restored CS3 functionality by configuring a Windows 7 Virtual Machine and just installing the bare-bones stuff I need, but that’s a short-term patch, not a long-haul answer. So I’m now evaluating other publishing packages.

Lightroom is the big problem; I’ve been with the package since its first release and thus have a solid ten years’ work in creating a workflow, geotagging and keywording the 25,000+ photos in the master catalog. Right now, there’s nothing quite like LR out there, although there are promises.

Having played with some of the alternative RAW converter/editors, I’m waiting for the ON1 crowd to include digital asset management in their product. Hopefully that comes along soon.

Bleh.

 

Revising the photo website

Since March of 2005 I’ve had the photo collection on a service called SmugMug; accessible either as http://www.woodallphotography.com or wpw.smugmug.com.

When I signed up all those years ago, the choice was hobbyist or professional; I took the professional choice, registered a domain, pointed it to the site, and started uploading photos. The fee was reasonable I thought for unlimited storage with video and commerce options. Prices have gone up a couple of times, but as an early-adopter I got something of a discount. And there it stood for quite some time.

A few weeks ago SmugMug decided that simply being a photo-hosting site wasn’t enough; they had to start bringing politics into the realm. As I can’t figure out how photos of old buildings, railroads, birds and landscapes create a political view I stay away from that, but it caused me to reevaluate the situation.

Running some comparisons, it is clear that for an advanced hobbyist with little need for ‘event-oriented commerce’ (aka wedding photography), while SmugMug continues as the best-available photo hosting service, I no longer need the extensive commerce features (most of my sales are either digital licensing or largish fine-art prints). So going forward, the photos will stay hosted on SmugMug, but the commerce fulfillment will move elsewhere. On an ongoing basis, it saves $140/year in hosting fees.

 

Making Lemonade…

I take lots of photographs. Digital cameras have made that easy to do, just hold the button down and as long as there’s memory and battery power… and for the wildlife, this works just fine. When the bird’s in flight or the fox is on the move burst shooting is often the only way to get a useful photo.

But I tend not to be quite so trigger-happy on a fixed object. And that can be a problem, especially if the fixed object wasn’t quite as permanent… as I thought.

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Thus we have this, an adequate though not particularly appealing photo of St Elizabeth’s Chapel by the Sea, an 1885 Episcopal church in Ortley Beach NJ. Alas a hurricane named Sandy decided to sweep this church out to sea, so I can’t go back and get a better shot. But I might be able to make this one more dramatic.

I usually work in color – that’s the world as I see it, and I have no history of using black and white in film days (allergies kept me out of the darkroom). Thus I rarely consider the grayscale option, except in cases like this.

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Now let’s just convert the photo over to grayscale, and pull down the luminance (brightness) channel on the blue sky… and now we get a sense of foreboding.

As observed by others, this photo is a bit “soft” – that’s mostly due to the lens used; the Pentax FA J 18-35mm “kit” lens. But at the time of this photo (March 2007) it was the wide-angle lens available.


Here’s another pairing of color to black-and-white… in color:

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The old church looks seriously forlorn in this April 2005 shot. Within a year it had been torn down.

And it’s a JPEG file. My first DSLR was the Pentax *istDS and I shot in JPEG for the first several months (this is image #990 on that camera, at about 2 months’ ownership). It’s not a bad shot, but now I would handle the task a bit differently.

Back we go to the grayscale, this time using Lightroom’s “green filter” preset as part of the conversion.

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I think it’s a bit more pleasing this way.

The building is the 1832 African Wesleyan church of Springtown, NJ – this Springtown being located near Greenwich in Cumberland County. I was in the area (along with Frank Greenagel) to photograph the Bethel Othello AME church, built 1838 and located about 200 yards west of this structure (shown below, April 2005).

photo-20050420-imgp1006

At the time we were not aware of any other church in the immediate area. However consulting the FW Beers “Atlas” map of Cumberland County, published in 1862, we find that there were three churches in the area – Bethel AME, the African Wesleyan, and an African Union church off to the north. I’ve highlighted Bethel in blue and the Wesleyan church in red on the map fragment below.

map-extract

 

It’s always nice to know for sure.

The only beverage used in creation of this post was coffee – estate Java, to be precise.